Hsc English Belonging Creative Writing Questions

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You’ve been subtle in your approach and tried to craft a story with extended layers. ” a tall sign stands before me, “Westfield Shopping Town Soon to be Erected HERE” says another atop of where used to be my house. ” a familiar voices calls behind me, I turn to face her. *”Village” rarely used in Australia.) “Josh you’re back!

“Five MILLION Dollar Development Plan Approved, ENTER YOUR BID NOW! “Indeed.” I thought, glancing across the busy, bulldozed acres, “so much have changed, but to change and to change for the better are two different things.” A voice echoes in my mind. debra now lives in Brisbane, Jane went into acting last year, surely you’ve seen Sam’s new bookshop in the city, and guess what! ” She said quickly, her voice filled with excitement. (Some minor idiom problems in this paragraph, but present tense correctly used to mark changed perspective.

“Many”, on the other hand, is plural; it is used with countables (“many friends”). We used to love that creek, running around the edges of that unspoilt bush land, swimming and bathing in its crystal-clear water. Then, impulsively, she picks up a bright, white pebble and throws it down the red, algae-infested creek, letting out a dry, rare curse.(* I have chosen the present continuous tense (“are …ing”) because it suggests time passing, or a longer process.) I watch as it plunges into the abyss. Well done.)We used to love that creek, running around the edges of that unspoilt bush land, swimming and bathing in its crystal-clear water.

I found him there the next morning, but its too late.” She tries to control her tears. Also, “much” caused a problem twice: it is always singular because it is used with uncountables (“much wheat”). They’d find the place, they said.” (Tense consistency again. “Would” is past tense of “will”, “ ‘d” when contracted.) We are standing* together, and, for a while, there is silence between us. 🙂 Also, you have done well to isolate the sentence like this. “Indeed.” Glancing across the busy, bulldozed acres, so much has changed, but to change and to change for the better are two different things. Debra now lives in Brisbane, Jane went into acting last year, surely you’ve seen Sam’s new bookshop in the city, and guess what! ” she says quickly, her voice filled with excitement.

We used to love that creek, running around the edges of that primitive bush land, swimming and bathing in its crystal-clear water. if you come back this time next year, you’ll see me opening up a real estate agent, I’ve already bought the land, want me to show you? Before I could reply she was off to another topic, “unbelievable isn’t it, first there’s the bulldozers, you know, came over and wiped that bush land out of my sight in less than half-a-day” she pauses, catches her breath, and continued “then there’s the developers, people in suits, you know, bought our farms, gave us jobs, all these stuff, its just amazing, we’re becoming part of the city, they say…” As she went on almost forever I’ve found my self staring into the distance, at the brave, tall, military pythons marching over the once-scenic hills, a pack of pigeons stands there, clinging onto the power lines, onto these fatal voltages like a sign, I felt uneasy. (There were tense sequence/consistency problems here.) Today I stand again on the edges of what used to be our town*, looking across the now dark, blood red creek at the barren, bulldozed acres where bushland once stood. (You were losing time-perspective by reverting to past tense. ” But she is already continuing, ignoring my question: “… First there’s the bulldozers, you know, came over and wiped that bush land out of my sight in less than half-a-day.” She pauses, catches her breath, and continues. He became so distressed that he jumped off that pylon. Today I stand again on the edges of what used to be our town, looking across the now dark, blood red creek at the barren, bulldozed acres where bushland once stood.

The student was required to write a story that communicated the idea of change. “Sure,” I replied, “still remember the days when Glen climbed these forbidden trees? I remember looking out over the endless plains at that distant, expanding city while everyone laughed as Glen feebly failed yet another attempt to conquer the forbidden tree. “It was the day after they demolished his Orphanage, and took down the chapel with it. I remember looking out over the endless plains at that distant, expanding city while everyone laughed as Glen feebly failed yet another attempt to conquer the forbidden tree. In the background, behind the bare hectares of ruined farmland, the smoggy, ever-hungry city is not so distant. Three: Get creative with your form Unless the question specifically states that you have to write a short story/narrative, you do not have to write a narrative.Many students may find it easier to write a narrative as they would have practiced these and are familiar with the structure, however, writing in another form such as diary entries or a letter can really make you stand out from the crowd.The events and the way the characters behave and respond to events must be believable given the context you are writing in.If you plan to write about some remote tribe or time from the past, do a little bit of background research so that if the question in your HSC exam allows you to use this story, you at least know about the context and what things could occur/how people would behave in this context. They’d find the place, they said.” We are standing together, and, for a while, there is silence between us. THSC Home · Year 10 · Year 11 - Preliminary · Year 12 - HSC · Upload Files Apprenticeship_Frequently Asked Questions · Establishment-Manual.One: Write What You Know Use the experiences you have had, the people you know, events you have been to or things you have observed as your starting point.Good writers use the emotions they have felt or ways they have responded or reacted to different situations as the basis for their writing.It is essentially a living hell, but don’t be disheartened.Use the ten tips in this guide to help you prepare and compose a response that doesn’t sound suspiciously like Mean Girls or another popular film or book your marker would be aware of.

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